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04-12-08, 12:09 PM Thanks!


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[INDENT]Do you know which word is the most misspelled on the Net? R E C I E V E! [/INDENT][INDENT]The correct spelling is R E C E I V E.[/INDENT][INDENT]When I went to school, we were taught this simple rule about "I" before "E" except after "C" "neighbor" or "eight."[/INDENT][INDENT]Perhaps schools or teachers today don't think it's necessary to teach simple spelling rules anymore because of computer technology...hmmm, too bad.[/INDENT][INDENT]Anyway we all know that most programs used by everybody with a computer has spell check capabilities AND of course, there's always the trusty dictionary![/INDENT][INDENT]That concludes "A Lesson in Spelling!" [/INDENT][INDENT]~~~~~~[/INDENT]

[INDENT]QUOTE:[/INDENT]

[INDENT]"In ancient shadows and twilights where childhood had strayed, the world's great sorrows were born and its heroes were made." [/INDENT][INDENT]-- [/INDENT][INDENT]George William Russell[/INDENT]
04-12-08, 12:26 PM Thanks!


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Since the English language is very complex, it may take time for somebody from another country to learn…so, you might hear visitors chatting away in their native language everywhere you go, which is a sure way to keep others from listening in on their conversation...

However, English isn’t always easy for those of us born in the USA either.

One reason is the different dialects[FONT=arial,helvetica,sans-serif][SIZE=1][COLOR=#800080][1][/COLOR][/SIZE][/FONT] throughout our country depending on where you’re living and of course the various colloquialisms[FONT=arial,helvetica,sans-serif][SIZE=1][COLOR=#800080][2][/COLOR][/SIZE][/FONT] you’ll hear while traveling.

Another reason might be that you have forgotten all those English lessons…so let me refresh your memory.

I will begin with “words that sound alike but have different meanings” that’s the definition of a homonym…Here's some examples:

base, bottom of anything; military station......bass, lowest male voice; (also a fish)
bare, reveal; uncover; naked......bear, a large 4-legged animal with coarse hair
beat, strike repeatedly; mix by stirring; police patrol area......beet, a red edible root
Ben, name for boys…been, the past tense of be......bin, enclosed space used for storing things
boar, a male swine; wild hog......bore, make a hole; monotonous tiresome person or thing
clause, group of words with subject & predicate[SIZE=1][COLOR=#800080][3][/COLOR][/SIZE]......claws, curved nails on animals paws
coarse, rough surface or texture of something......course, direction taken; educational program
dew, moisture deposited on cool surfaces at night......due, owed or payable as an obligation
fair, clear and sunny; impartial......fare, price of transportation; food; paying customer
for, a preposition[SIZE=1][COLOR=#800080][4][/COLOR][/SIZE] since; because…fore, front; forward......four, (4) a number
gait, manner of moving; pattern of stepping......gate, a movable barrier in a fence or wall
hail, call out to; precipitation of small snow or ice pellets......hale, free from disease; robust
hair, threadlike outgrowth from the skin or mass of such fibers on the head......hare, a rabbit
hear, perceive by ear; learn......here, an adverb[SIZE=1][COLOR=#800080][5][/COLOR][/SIZE] now; at this point; this place
hoarse, (voice) sounding husky or harsh......horse, a 4-legged animal for riding & racing
load, burden; cargo; quantity carried......lode, ore deposit; vein
mail, system used to send letters & packages......male, a man
Mary, a girl’s name…marry, join as husband or wife......merry, full of fun
pail, a bucket......pale, lose color; faded
poor, needy…pore, minute opening......pour, cause to flow from package or container
pray, beg; entreat; implore......prey, animal seized as food
sail, move over water or in the air by wind action......sale, offering of goods at reduced prices
seam, line formed by the junction of any two edges......seem, appear to be; feel as if
soar, float aloft......sore, injured area; angry
tail, follow closely; a flexible appendage......tale, a brief story; a lie
their, a pronoun[SIZE=1][COLOR=#800080][6][/COLOR][/SIZE] possessive case of they......there, in that place
vain, conceited…vane, device that shows wind direction......vein, blood vessel to heart; marking in wood
vial, a small glass bottle or tube......vile, corrupt; offensive
weather, atmospheric conditions such as sunny, cloudy......whether, a conjunction[SIZE=1][COLOR=#800080][7][/COLOR][/SIZE] either

To be continued...

[SIZE=2][COLOR=#800080][1][/COLOR][/SIZE] Local characteristics of speech

[SIZE=2][COLOR=#800080][2][/COLOR][/SIZE] Informal conversation or word usage

[SIZE=2][COLOR=#800080][3][/COLOR][/SIZE] Word or words that make a statement about the subject

[SIZE=2][COLOR=#800080][4][/COLOR][/SIZE] Word used to show the relationship between noun or pronoun and other words

[SIZE=2][COLOR=#800080][5][/COLOR][/SIZE] Words that modifies a verb, adjective or adverb

[SIZE=2][COLOR=#800080][6][/COLOR][/SIZE] Word used instead of a noun, as he – she – it

[SIZE=2][COLOR=#800080][7][/COLOR][/SIZE] Word that links words


04-12-08, 12:40 PM Thanks!


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"English language" by Joseph M. Williams




Ok, last week you read about homonyms: “words that sound alike but have different meanings” …and, you were given examples with a brief definition for each word…also, these words: preposition (for) - adverb (here) - pronoun (their) and conjunction (whether) which were part of said definition were further outlined as a “note of comment or reference at the bottom of a page” which is (the definition for footnote).

However, since I’m not a teacher or well-versed on this subject for that matter (this was just an observation from spending time on the Net*)…

*NOTE: The1st paragraph and beginning of this paragraph was written by BJ Minnich, Site Owner (5/8/2005 - 5/11/2005)...

Let me close with the following Article written by Joseph M. Williams, PhD, Professor of English, The University of Chicago…(keyword: grammar) from World Book Online Reference Center. 2005. World Book, Inc. 8 May 2005. [COLOR=#0000ff]http://www.aolsvc.worldbook.aol.com/wb/Article?id=ar181740[/COLOR]



English language is the most widely spoken language in the world. It is used as either a primary or secondary language in many countries.

During the 1500's, fewer than 2 million people spoke English. All of them lived in what is now the United Kingdom. Through the centuries, as the result of various historical events, English spread throughout the world. Today, about 400 million people speak English as their native language. Most of them live in Australia, Canada, the United Kingdom, Ireland, New Zealand, South Africa, and the United States.

Another 100 million people, chiefly living in Bangladesh, India, Pakistan, and in many African countries, speak English in addition to their own language. An additional 200 million people probably know at least some English.


Characteristics of English
Vocabulary. English has a larger vocabulary than any other language. There are more than 600,000 words in the largest dictionaries of the English language.

Some English words have been passed on from generation to generation as far back as scholars can trace. These words, such as woman, man, sun, hand, love, go, and eat, express basic ideas and feelings. Later, many words were borrowed from other languages, including Arabic, French, German, Greek, Italian, Latin, Russian, and Spanish. For example, algebra is from Arabic, fashion from French, piano from Italian, and canyon from Spanish.

A number of words, such as doghouse and splashdown, were formed by combining other words. New words are also created by blending words. For example, motor and hotel were blended into motel. Words can be shortened to form new words, as was done with history to form story. Words called acronyms are formed by using the first letter or letters of several words. The word radar is an acronym for radio detection and ranging. [FONT=arial,helvetica,sans-serif][COLOR=#0000ff]Print "Vocabulary" subsection[/COLOR][/FONT]

Pronunciation and spelling in English sometimes seem illogical or inconsistent. Many words are spelled similarly though pronounced differently. Examples include cough, though, and through. Other words, such as blue, crew, to, too, and shoe, have similar pronunciations but are spelled differently. Many of these variations show changes that occurred during the development of English. The spelling of some words remained the same through the centuries, though their pronunciation changed.
[FONT=arial,helvetica,sans-serif][COLOR=#0000ff]Print "Pronunciation and spelling" subsection[/COLOR][/FONT]

Grammar is the set of principles used to create sentences. These principles define the elements used to assemble sentences and the relationships between the elements. The elements include parts of speech and inflections.

Parts of speech are the word categories of the English language. Scholars do not all agree on how to describe the parts of speech. The traditional description lists eight classes: nouns, pronouns, verbs, adjectives, adverbs, prepositions, conjunctions, and interjections. The most important relationships of the parts of speech include subject and verb, verb and predicate, and modifier and the word modified.

Some modern scholars also divide the parts of speech into two categories, content words and function words. Content words are the main parts of speech—nouns, verbs, adverbs, and adjectives—and carry the basic vocabulary meanings. For example, dog, write, happy, and seldom are content words. These words are also called form classes. Function words express relationships between content words in a sentence.

For example, in, because, the, very, and not are function words. They show the grammatical, or structural, meanings of the sentence and are also called structure classes. Function words include articles, prepositions, pronouns, and conjunctions. See [FONT=arial,helvetica,sans-serif][COLOR=#800080]Parts of speech.[/COLOR][/FONT]

English has fewer inflections than most other European languages. An inflection is a variation of the form of a word that gives the word a different meaning or function. An English noun has only two inflections, the plural and the possessive. Inflections are used to change the tense and number of a verb or the case of a pronoun. Inflections can change adjectives to the comparative or the superlative—for example, big, bigger, biggest.

Grammar also defines the order in which parts of speech may be used. The subject of a sentence usually comes first in the word order in English. It is generally followed by the verb and then the object. Single words that modify nouns are usually placed before the noun, but phrases that modify nouns are usually placed after the noun. Words that modify verbs can be put before or after the verb. For more information on word order and sentence patterns, see [FONT=arial,helvetica,sans-serif][COLOR=#0000ff]Sentence.[/COLOR][/FONT] [FONT=arial,helvetica,sans-serif][COLOR=#0000ff]Print "Grammar" subsection[/COLOR][/FONT]

to be continued...
04-12-08, 12:47 PM Thanks!


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"English language" by Joseph M. Williams
continuation...from previous posting (was too long)



The development of English
Origins. The earliest source of the English language was a prehistoric language that modern scholars call Proto-Indo-European (PIE). PIE was probably spoken about 5,000 years ago by people who lived in the region north of the Black Sea, in southeastern Europe. These people migrated through the centuries and gradually developed new languages.

One group of people who spoke PIE migrated west and divided into groups who spoke languages that were the ancestors of the Germanic, Greek, and Latin tongues. The Germanic languages developed into English, Danish, Dutch, German, Norwegian, and Swedish. The ancient Greek language became modern Greek, and early Latin grew into French, Italian, and Spanish.

The earliest known language in what is now Britain was spoken by a people called the Celts. The Romans started to conquer the Celts in A.D. 43 and ruled much of Britain until the early 400's, when they returned to Rome. During the mid-400's, Germanic people who lived along the North Sea invaded Britain. The invaders belonged to three main tribes—the Angles, the Jutes, and the Saxons. All three tribes spoke their own Germanic dialect, but they probably understood one another. The Angles settled in central Britain. The word England came from a word meaning the Angle folk or land of the Angles, which was used by the late 800's to refer to all the Anglo-Saxon people and their lands. The language of the Angles, Saxons, and Jutes became known as English.

The history of the English language can be divided into three main periods. The language of the first period, which began about 500 and ended about 1100, is called Old English. During the next period, from about 1100 to 1485, the people spoke Middle English. The language of the period from about 1485 to the present is known as Modern English. [FONT=arial,helvetica,sans-serif][SIZE=2][COLOR=#0000ff]Print "Origins" subsection[/COLOR][/SIZE][/FONT]


Old English was mainly a mixture of the Germanic languages of the Angles, Jutes, and Saxons. Old English resembles modern German more than it does modern English. Old English had many inflections, as does modern German, and its word order and pronunciation resembled those of modern German.

The vocabulary of Old English was chiefly Germanic, though some words came from the language of the Celts. The Germanic people had learned some Latin words while they lived on the European continent. These people brought some of those words to England and added them to Old English. More Latin words were added during the 500's and the 600's, when Christianity spread in England.

During the late 800's, Viking invaders from Denmark and Norway settled in northeast England. As a result, many words from Scandinavian languages became part of Old English. Gradually, many inflections of Old English were dropped. People also began to put words into a more regular order and to use more prepositions to indicate relationships between words. [FONT=arial,helvetica,sans-serif][SIZE=2][COLOR=#0000ff]Print "Old English" subsection[/COLOR][/SIZE][/FONT]


Middle English. In 1066, England was conquered by the Normans, a people from the area in France that is now called Normandy. Their leader, William the Conqueror, became king of England. The Normans took control of all English institutions, including the government and the church.

Most of the English people continued to speak English. However, many of the members of the upper class in England learned Norman French because they wanted influence and power. The use of French words eventually became fashionable in England. The English borrowed thousands of these words and made them part of their own language. The French-influenced language of England during this period is now called Middle English.

The Normans intermarried with the English and, through the years, became increasingly distant—socially, economically, and culturally—from France. The Normans began to speak English in daily life. By the end of the 1300's, the French influence had declined sharply in England. English was used again in the courts and in business affairs, where French had replaced it. [FONT=arial,helvetica,sans-serif][SIZE=2][COLOR=#0000ff]Print "Middle English" subsection[/COLOR][/SIZE][/FONT]


Modern English. By about 1485, English had lost most of its Old English inflections, and its pronunciation and word order closely resembled those of today. During this period, the vocabulary of English expanded by borrowing words from many other languages. Beginning in the 1600's, the language spread throughout the world as the English explored and colonized Africa, Australia, India, and North America. Different dialects of the English language developed in these areas.

Today, English is the international language of science and technology. In addition, the English language is used throughout the world in business and diplomacy.
[FONT=arial,helvetica,sans-serif][SIZE=2][COLOR=#800080]Print "Modern English" subsection[/COLOR][/SIZE][/FONT]
04-12-08, 12:59 PM Thanks!
dehawkinz

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LOL

the problem with english and rules, is that for every rule, there is an exception that disproves the rule :)

you missed out my favourite "i before e..." disprover

SCIENCE

Basically, rules are good in principle, but they will always be contradicted, so be patient with people who mis-spell :)

And I am not going to touch on the contradictions between ' real ' English and ' american ' English :D

DeHawkinz
DeHawkinz
Team DeHawkinz Team Leader


04-12-08, 02:13 PM Thanks!


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Aye Up from Kevin in Sheffield .... Yorkshire's Finest

I call English my mother tongue as my father rarely had chance to use it

Is there another word for synonym?

Why is abbreviation such a long word?

Having said all that, I'm not a fan of spelling mistakes on websites. Just try a little harder.

Regards ..... Kevin - Wednesdayite
04-13-08, 06:51 AM Thanks!
revjoybunny

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on website spelling mistakes should always be sorted out after all we have spell chickers lol

Seriously I dont like to see spelling mistakes either
Rev Joy Leader of the [color=blue]surfin bunnies[/color]
[url]http://www.startxchange.com/teams/32/[/url]
My Main store [url]http://www.joybunnysartdesigns.co.uk[/url]
My Etsy store [url]http://www.etsy.com/shop.php?user_id=5619010[/url]
04-13-08, 07:24 AM Thanks!
dehawkinz

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but some spell checkers can't spell :)

eye can rite reel good - this passes my spell checker, but most English speakers would know this is spelt wrong.

Indeed here is an irony for you - the forum spell checker thinks spelt is wrong, but a online spelling checker thinks it is right :)

DeHawkinz
DeHawkinz
Team DeHawkinz Team Leader


04-13-08, 12:32 PM Thanks!
lajab5

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I have to stop and look at the word to make sure I spell right. If in doubt I ask my daughter.....LOL......my problem is dyslexia......I don't turn letter around I just mix them up when spelling........(frist.....first.....example).....I use the backspace A LOT........LOL
Take time to laugh, It is music for the soul.:p
http://www.kooday.com/refer.asp?ref=39199
[url]http://ipayu2advertise.com/pages/index.php?refid=afwife[/url]
[url]http://www.clixsense.com/?2610787[/url]
04-13-08, 12:56 PM Thanks!
nsant46

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Hi msbeejay,

I am now thanking you, but I am sure to let you all well understand what I want mean each time either I am posting a new thread or I am answering to someone in this forum.

I think that just because I am italian I can't know your dialects or colloquialisms (execpt "asap, btw, lol"), but just because I am italian I have to write a scolastic, official enghlish, so everyone can understand my words.

I noticed that we foreigners write the grammatical exact way and you sometimes don't (your=you're, you=your, yep=yes, nope=not, wanna=want, gotta=got, "working?"= are you working?", and, first of all, the "do" and/or "any" use in affermative expressions!?!). Maybe this way we foreigners are learning your dialects too.:)

I am talking about the 35-40 sites in english I am actually involved in, not only TEs, either from USA, UK, Canada, Australia, etc. Only two admin of two sites from northern Europe almost always write correctly.

Also, I think all we foreigners can read our english dictionary, if we need it.

Have a great Sunday
Noemi
Excusme for my incorrect english, I learned it by myself:)
04-13-08, 01:01 PM Thanks!
nsant46

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Like I just told answering the last msb... post, read your english dictionary and all will be OK!
Have a great Sunday
Noemi
Excusme for my incorrect english, I learned it by myself:)
04-13-08, 01:02 PM Thanks!


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Spelling ... An interesting phenomenon.

I have an internal spell checker that sometimes deceives me, and I don't discover errors until a message has been posted and re-read a couple of times. I not only use the backspace key a lot, but also the edit button! :)

I may be overconfident but I think my English spelling is adequate, and I try to write correctly. When reading there are diferent "levels": In a forum like this we could use some tolerance. After all, the meaning is more important than the spelling. Websites, newspapers, books etc. that are supposed to be serious should take care to correct spelling errors, or people would lose respect for the publisher. If it's a question of sign-up:
I wouldn't sign up to a website with a sloppy language.

If you have problems with spelling, don't worry too much when you write in a forum like this, but have your text checked by a person before you publish it on a website.
04-13-08, 01:14 PM Thanks!
nsant46

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Hi,

Check out please my answer to your last post about.

Thanks
Noemi
Excusme for my incorrect english, I learned it by myself:)
04-13-08, 01:20 PM Thanks!
nsant46

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Hi,

Check out please my answer to your last post about.

Thanks
Noemi
Excusme for my incorrect english, I learned it by myself:)
04-13-08, 02:04 PM Thanks!


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Ladies and Gentlemen, thank you for your responses...

No offense was meant by this particular article that I
am sharing with the StartXchange Forum Community...

I know people get in a big hurry when posting their replies or writing "New Threads" ...

However, Spelling is important on Websites, in Newsletter, eZines, eBooks and whatever other media is used for Marketing or Advertising one's Products and/or Services.

If a word does not look right to me, I look it up in the dictionary...

As you all mentioned spell checker cannot always determine the correct spelling of all words used on the Internet particularly when it comes to names and homonyms (a word with the same pronunciation as another, but with a different origin and spelling)

Afterall, nobody is perfect and we all make mistakes...that's what makes us human LOL

God Bless and Keep on surfing...
04-13-08, 03:24 PM Thanks!
nsant46

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Hi msbeejay,

Have you read my answer to your precisation about dictionary?
I am interesting what you think about.
Noemi
Excusme for my incorrect english, I learned it by myself:)
04-13-08, 03:51 PM Thanks!


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Hi msbeejay,

Have you read my answer to your precisation about dictionary?
I am interesting what you think about.
Noemi


Not sure how to respond to your comment...

It is a good idea to have an up-to-date dictionary
since newer editions will include the most recent
words and definitions that have been added...

Other than that, don't know what else to say!?

God Bless and Keep on surfing...
04-14-08, 04:59 AM Thanks!
haccel

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Aoccdrnig to a rscheearch at Cmabrigde Uinervtisy, it deosn't mttaer in waht oredr the ltteers in a wrod are, the olny iprmoetnt tihng is taht the frist and lsat ltteer be at the rghit pclae. The rset can be a toatl mses and you can sitll raed it wouthit porbelm. Tihs is bcuseae the huamn mnid deos not raed ervey lteter by istlef, but the wrod as a wlohe.

LOL

You know what they say, rules are meant to be broken.

Interesting though. See what Wiki has to say on this:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/I_before_E_except_after_C

Happy surfing :)
04-14-08, 09:46 AM Thanks!
nsant46

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Hey haccel,

Even I understood what you wrote. What would you mean?
It seems to me an unusefoul exercise that none are now needing.:)
We are talking (=msbeejay is talking) about we foreigners that can't understand and write english.
Thanks for your time
Noemi
Excusme for my incorrect english, I learned it by myself:)
04-14-08, 09:53 AM Thanks!
nsant46

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Hi msbeejay,

I yesterday post to you this:
"I am now thanking you, but I am sure to let you all well understand what I want mean each time either I am posting a new thread or I am answering to someone in this forum.

I think that just because I am italian I can't know your dialects or colloquialisms (execpt "asap, btw, lol"), but just because I am italian I have to write a scolastic, official enghlish, so everyone can understand my words.

I noticed that we foreigners write the grammatical exact way and you sometimes don't (your=you're, you=your, yep=yes, nope=not, wanna=want, gotta=got, "working?"= are you working?", and, first of all, the "do" and/or "any" use in affermative expressions!?!). Maybe this way we foreigners are learning your dialects too.

I am talking about the 35-40 sites in english I am actually involved in, not only TEs, either from USA, UK, Canada, Australia, etc. Only two admin of two sites from northern Europe almost always write correctly.

Also, I think all we foreigners can read our english dictionary, if we need it.

Have a great Sunday
Noemi"

Did you read it? I think you didn't.
Take care
Noemi
Excusme for my incorrect english, I learned it by myself:)